50’s

1954 International Harvester R110

1954 International Harvester R110 1954 International Harvester R110 1954 International Harvester R110 1954 International Harvester R110 1954 International Harvester R110

Powered by a 220 cubic inch inline six and a three-speed manual, the R110 was a popular truck in its heyday, back when International Harvester was still a major player in the light truck industry. Their market share began to dwindle through the 1960s, and by 1975 they had discontinued all trucks. The venerable Scout soldiered on until the 1980 model year, when International Harvester’s passenger car division was shuttered and the company moved on to heavy-duty trucks and school buses.

Century City, CA

Photos by The Professor

1954 Packard Patrician

1954 Packard Patrician 1954 Packard Patrician 1954 Packard Patrician 1954 Packard Patrician 1954 Packard Patrician 1954 Packard Patrician 1954 Packard Patrician

The last real flagship of the famed Packard line, the 1954 model was the last to boast Packard’s straight eight engine before  a new V8 was introduced with the 1955 restyle. Just 2,760 found buyers in 1954, showcasing the decline of the Packard marque, which would disappear after 1958.

El Segundo, CA

Photos by The Professor

 

 

1951 Chevrolet Styleline Deluxe Convertible

1951 Chevrolet Deluxe Convertible 1951 Chevrolet Deluxe Convertible 1951 Chevrolet Deluxe Convertible 1951 Chevrolet Deluxe Convertible 1951 Chevrolet Deluxe Convertible 1951 Chevrolet Deluxe Convertible1951 Chevrolet Styleline Deluxe Convertible

Steve McQueen owned one of these, and drove it in the final movie of his career–The Hunter (1980). His sold for $84,000 in 2013. With a standard 3-speed manual and an optional 2-speed Powerglide automatic, nearly 50% of the Stylelines sold were with the Powerglide, like the example pictured here.

This one was spotted at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, CA.

Los Angeles, CA

Photos by The Professor

 

1959 Messerschmitt KR200 Kabrio

1959 Messerschmitt KR200 Cabrio 1959 Messerschmitt KR200 Cabrio 1959 Messerschmitt KR200 Cabrio 1959 Messerschmitt KR200 Cabrio 1959 Messerschmitt KR200 Cabrio 1959 Messerschmitt KR200 Cabrio

Made by the company far more famous for producing fighter jets for the German Luftwaffe during World War II, the KR200 “bubble car” was originally conceived as a result of temporary sanctions against aircraft manufacturing in the Messerschmitt factories. When the sanctions were lifted in 1956, the rights to the car were sold to a man named Fritz Fend, who established a company called Fahrzeug-und Maschinenbau GmbH Regensburg (FMR); hence the “FMR” logo on the hood of this microcar.

It produced all of 9.9 horsepower and was shorter than the wheelbase of a new Chevrolet Impala. The last picture shows a stark juxtaposition between the hulking Bronco and the diminutive Messerschmitt–it looks like a diecast model. Definitely a model for those with a secure self-image as their head sticks out a few feet above the top of the car.

Pacific Palisades, CA

Photos by The Professor

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